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People, Fashion & Trends

Rossella Jardini on Social Media

By Sofia Celeste 16 March 2016

MILAN, ITALY - Rossella Jardini made a comeback this February with a new eponymous women's wear line that combines Milanese elegance with the ironic playfulness she mastered in her 20 years at Moschino.

A tribute to tomboy chic, the accessible-luxury, pret-a-porter collection mixes classic blazers and pantsuits with bohemian, bejeweled headscarves and ruffled silk collars.

In a sitting room in her grandoise 19th century condo on Milan's Viale Majno, flanked by her Cavalier King Charles Spaniels Jolie and Charlie, Jardini chats with Fairplay about social media and how her line is for women of all ages.

Born in the 1950's, using social media can be quite a challenge. What is your feeling about social media as a tool to drive your brand?

I got on Facebook and Instagram almost as a joke in the beginning. After I left Moschino, I spent about a year and a half in silence. I got on social media so that people will remember me.

What is your favorite out of all of them?

My favorite is Instagram because it is more immediate. Facebook is more about words and phrases and I don't want to write. I would probably write bad things and it is better if I stay away.

I see you are also using Snapchat. Is it as hard for you as it is for me?

It is really difficult and my assistants explained it to me six or seven times and I still don't know how to use it.

Is fashion a way to communicate with young women of today?

Yes absolutely, but I have to say, this generation scares me. I taught my first lesson at Politecnico della Moda, and I was in front of 50 girls, and I was shocked. Out of 50 there were only three that raised their hands when I asked them if they wanted to be designers. These 50 girls were like salt statues and it was like pulling teeth to get them to participate.

You left Moschino when they hired Jeremy Scott to replace you, but you came back after two years and wowed the fashion crowd with your new line that is a real expression of your own style. What advice can you give us about change?

I had a lot of change and lots of different jobs. You know they say... there is he who has talent and he who has vocation. I have a lot of vocation and I think Franco Moschino had talent. I have some talent too, but I shouldn't be the one to say that.

And on personal elegance?

Eleganza and style are innate. You can't study how to become elegant if you don't have it coming from within. I probably inherited my sense of elegance from my mum and my grandmother. In the 1920's my grandmother would get into her carriage and ride two days back and forth to Galtrucco in Milan's Piazza Duomo just to buy fabrics. I probably inherited my sense of style from her.

And your own line? Who is the Rossella Jardini woman?

She is ageless. Age is something that doesn't exist in my opinion. There is a lot of nostalgia in this collection. She is a woman who resembles me and the women who were my clients at Moschino.

What do you think about fashion's dependence on social media and technology for growth?

I think it is useful to everyone. What I noticed on my Instagram is that people are more interested in ME than the clothes that I make. I can get a few hundred likes posting a photo of a piece from the collection. But if I am there, I notice that people want to enter into my life. This scares me a little bit. Now people stop me on the street. When I worked for Moschino, I had no intention of being a person that stood out. Now I go in a restaurant and ten people turn their heads and I hear that they are talking about me. But I guess I wanted the bike, and now I need to just ride it.

 

 



Sofia Celeste
FAIRPLAY Editor-in-Chief

When she is not hunting down the latest in tech and fashion, Sofia Celeste is scouting artisan talent for her online magazine bacoluxury.com. Born in the US and raised on the Pacific Island of Guam, she went on to write for Dow Jones Newswires and the Wall Street Journal. Her work is now regularly published in top fashion publications NOWFASHION and WWD.

MILAN, ITALY - Rossella Jardini made a comeback this February with a new eponymous women's wear line that combines Milanese elegance with the ironic playfulness she mastered in her 20 years at Moschino.

A tribute to tomboy chic, the accessible-luxury, pret-a-porter collection mixes classic blazers and pantsuits with bohemian, bejeweled headscarves and ruffled silk collars.

In a sitting room in her grandoise 19th century condo on Milan's Viale Majno, flanked by her Cavalier King Charles Spaniels Jolie and Charlie, Jardini chats with Fairplay about social media and how her line is for women of all ages.

Born in the 1950's, using social media can be quite a challenge. What is your feeling about social media as a tool to drive your brand?

I got on Facebook and Instagram almost as a joke in the beginning. After I left Moschino, I spent about a year and a half in silence. I got on social media so that people will remember me.

What is your favorite out of all of them?

My favorite is Instagram because it is more immediate. Facebook is more about words and phrases and I don't want to write. I would probably write bad things and it is better if I stay away.

I see you are also using Snapchat. Is it as hard for you as it is for me?

It is really difficult and my assistants explained it to me six or seven times and I still don't know how to use it.

Is fashion a way to communicate with young women of today?

Yes absolutely, but I have to say, this generation scares me. I taught my first lesson at Politecnico della Moda, and I was in front of 50 girls, and I was shocked. Out of 50 there were only three that raised their hands when I asked them if they wanted to be designers. These 50 girls were like salt statues and it was like pulling teeth to get them to participate.

You left Moschino when they hired Jeremy Scott to replace you, but you came back after two years and wowed the fashion crowd with your new line that is a real expression of your own style. What advice can you give us about change?

I had a lot of change and lots of different jobs. You know they say... there is he who has talent and he who has vocation. I have a lot of vocation and I think Franco Moschino had talent. I have some talent too, but I shouldn't be the one to say that.

And on personal elegance?

Eleganza and style are innate. You can't study how to become elegant if you don't have it coming from within. I probably inherited my sense of elegance from my mum and my grandmother. In the 1920's my grandmother would get into her carriage and ride two days back and forth to Galtrucco in Milan's Piazza Duomo just to buy fabrics. I probably inherited my sense of style from her.

And your own line? Who is the Rossella Jardini woman?

She is ageless. Age is something that doesn't exist in my opinion. There is a lot of nostalgia in this collection. She is a woman who resembles me and the women who were my clients at Moschino.

What do you think about fashion's dependence on social media and technology for growth?

I think it is useful to everyone. What I noticed on my Instagram is that people are more interested in ME than the clothes that I make. I can get a few hundred likes posting a photo of a piece from the collection. But if I am there, I notice that people want to enter into my life. This scares me a little bit. Now people stop me on the street. When I worked for Moschino, I had no intention of being a person that stood out. Now I go in a restaurant and ten people turn their heads and I hear that they are talking about me. But I guess I wanted the bike, and now I need to just ride it.

 

 



Sofia Celeste
FAIRPLAY Editor-in-Chief

When she is not hunting down the latest in tech and fashion, Sofia Celeste is scouting artisan talent for her online magazine bacoluxury.com. Born in the US and raised on the Pacific Island of Guam, she went on to write for Dow Jones Newswires and the Wall Street Journal. Her work is now regularly published in top fashion publications NOWFASHION and WWD.

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