Fairplay

  • Photo by Antoine Geiger
  • Photo by Antoine Geiger
  • Photo by Antoine Geiger
  • Photo by Antoine Geiger
  • Photo by Antoine Geiger
  • Photo by Antoine Geiger
  • Photo by Antoine Geiger
  • Photo by Antoine Geiger
  • Painting by Nicole Einsenman
  • Painting by Nicole Einsenman
  • Painting by Nicole Einsenman
By Sofia Celeste - 12 October 2017

Smartphone Addiction: How Much is Too Much?

MILAN, ITALY – “Chickity-check yo self before you wreck yo self,” went the wise words of a 1992 Ice Cube rap hit. Funny how those words ring true today, in an age in which most social interaction takes place on a 6 x 3 inch piece of plastic and glass.

So how much is too much? Try 2,617 times per day. That’s how much a person taps or swipes their phone, according to Dscout, a startup that performs consumer research studies.

“Brain Drain: The Mere Presence of One’s Own Smartphone Reduces Available Cognitive Capacity” was written by Adrian F. Ward, Kristen Duke, Ayelet Gneezy, and Maarten W. Bos and illustrated how smartphone addiction interferes with a person’s cognitive abilities.

The University of Chicago research paper also highlighted how overuse has a startling impact on basic decision-making skills and attention span.

Outside of academia, the smart phone craze has also impacted the art world. The 20 year-old French photographer Antoine Geiger has made a name for himself with his “real-life” photos of normal people having their faces sucked into their cellphones. The project, dubbed SUR-FAKE, is a historical testament to the growing epidemic.

Bologna-based photographer Max Cavallari and painter Nicole Eisenman’s work also capture a very bleak picture of this generation’s human interaction.

Even techies in Silicon Valley are taking strides to limit their interaction with technology. An article published in The Guardian earlier this month addressed how techies who created smartphones and their addictive accoutrements are also taking strides to break their addiction.

The Guardian interviewed one of the engineers involved in creating Facebook’s “like” feature. Justin Rosenstein, the paper reported, now has altered his laptop to block Reddit, and has banned himself from Snapchat, which he compares to heroin. He also limited his use of Facebook and has his assistant set up parental controls to limit his interaction with apps.

The fashion industry will not go unscathed. Spectators widely interact with brands via “heroin” apps like Snapchat and Instagram. Vanguard brands like Gucci have positioned themselves to communicate its brands via social media — especially Instagram.

Still purists remain. Brunello Cucinelli, Italy’s king of cashmere, was keen on limiting tech dependence when his success really began to crest. His Solomeo-based employees are not allowed to send emails after 5 pm or on weekends. At a recent Istituto Marangoni Fashion Education Summit, he admonished the industry for grooming a generation dependent on technology from the start — a legion of young adults more fixated on creating a “startup” than actually creating something useful and working hard. “We have severely misguided today’s generation. We have taught them only to do startups of which 96 percent fail,” Cucinelli added, issuing an additional foreboding warning to the crowd.

“Technology is robbing us of our soul.”

   

 



Sofia Celeste
FAIRPLAY Editor-in-Chief

When she is not hunting down the latest in tech and fashion, Sofia Celeste is scouting artisan talent for her online magazine bacoluxury.com. Born in the US and raised on the Pacific Island of Guam, she went on to write for Dow Jones Newswires and the Wall Street Journal. Her work is now regularly published in top fashion publications NOWFASHION and WWD.

MILAN, ITALY – “Chickity-check yo self before you wreck yo self,” went the wise words of a 1992 Ice Cube rap hit. Funny how those words ring true today, in an age in which most social interaction takes place on a 6 x 3 inch piece of plastic and glass.

So how much is too much? Try 2,617 times per day. That’s how much a person taps or swipes their phone, according to Dscout, a startup that performs consumer research studies.

“Brain Drain: The Mere Presence of One’s Own Smartphone Reduces Available Cognitive Capacity” was written by Adrian F. Ward, Kristen Duke, Ayelet Gneezy, and Maarten W. Bos and illustrated how smartphone addiction interferes with a person’s cognitive abilities.

The University of Chicago research paper also highlighted how overuse has a startling impact on basic decision-making skills and attention span.

Outside of academia, the smart phone craze has also impacted the art world. The 20 year-old French photographer Antoine Geiger has made a name for himself with his “real-life” photos of normal people having their faces sucked into their cellphones. The project, dubbed SUR-FAKE, is a historical testament to the growing epidemic.

Bologna-based photographer Max Cavallari and painter Nicole Eisenman’s work also capture a very bleak picture of this generation’s human interaction.

Even techies in Silicon Valley are taking strides to limit their interaction with technology. An article published in The Guardian earlier this month addressed how techies who created smartphones and their addictive accoutrements are also taking strides to break their addiction.

The Guardian interviewed one of the engineers involved in creating Facebook’s “like” feature. Justin Rosenstein, the paper reported, now has altered his laptop to block Reddit, and has banned himself from Snapchat, which he compares to heroin. He also limited his use of Facebook and has his assistant set up parental controls to limit his interaction with apps.

The fashion industry will not go unscathed. Spectators widely interact with brands via “heroin” apps like Snapchat and Instagram. Vanguard brands like Gucci have positioned themselves to communicate its brands via social media — especially Instagram.

Still purists remain. Brunello Cucinelli, Italy’s king of cashmere, was keen on limiting tech dependence when his success really began to crest. His Solomeo-based employees are not allowed to send emails after 5 pm or on weekends. At a recent Istituto Marangoni Fashion Education Summit, he admonished the industry for grooming a generation dependent on technology from the start — a legion of young adults more fixated on creating a “startup” than actually creating something useful and working hard. “We have severely misguided today’s generation. We have taught them only to do startups of which 96 percent fail,” Cucinelli added, issuing an additional foreboding warning to the crowd.

“Technology is robbing us of our soul.”

   

 



Sofia Celeste
FAIRPLAY Editor-in-Chief

When she is not hunting down the latest in tech and fashion, Sofia Celeste is scouting artisan talent for her online magazine bacoluxury.com. Born in the US and raised on the Pacific Island of Guam, she went on to write for Dow Jones Newswires and the Wall Street Journal. Her work is now regularly published in top fashion publications NOWFASHION and WWD.

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