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  • Photo by Bruce Weber, "A letter to True", Hope, November 2003
  • Photo by David LaChapelle, Vogue Italia, October 2005
  • Photo by Ellen von Unwerth, Vogue Italia, February 2001The Vagaries of Fashion
  • Photo by Peter Lindbergh, Vogue Italia February 2007Tomorrow Vision
  • Photo by Steven Meisel, Vogue Italia August 2010Water and Oil
  • Photo by Steven Meisel, Vogue Italia July 2005Makeover Madness
  • Makeover MadnessPhoto by Steven Meisel, Vogue Italia July 2007Super Mods Enter Rehab
  • Photo by Steven Meisel, Vogue Italia September 2006State of Emergency
  • Photo by Tim Walker, Vogue Unique September 1999Couture Delivery
  • Photo by Tim Walker, Vogue Italia June 2001LOVE

Vogue Photo Festival: A Somber Tribute

MILAN, ITALY - Anyone familiar with the late Franca Sozzani’s career, knows full well that Vogue Italia used photography and visual art as a powerful tool to respond to the most controversial global scandals, catastrophes and social issues of our time.

It is no surprise that in her absence, Vogue Italia is powering on with the Photo Vogue Festival, the first international festival of fashion photography linked to a magazine, which unfolded to Milan from November 16 to 19.

Two main events kicked off the event: the industrial space BASE Milano was dedicated to the Fashion & Politics in Vogue Italia exhibit which highlighted the magazine's most impacting stories on issues such as environmental disaster, violence, diversity and the obsession with cosmetic surgery. The showcase underscored Emanuele Farneti’s commitment as editor, to continue that mission, as demonstrated through recent covers and its latest issue, for example, which was dedicated to the over-60s demographic. Images by Steven Meisel, David Lachapelle, Bruce Weber, Tim Walker, Peter Lindbergh, Miles Alridge, Mert & Marcus, Ethan James Green and Ellen Von Unwert evoked re ection on how fashion photography can often diminish taboos and combat racism.

The other main event, and perhaps the most emotional, was the exhibit at Palazzo Reale, which was dedicated to photographer Paolo Roversi’s 50-year career.

Roversi is often referred to as the “the maestro of fashion photography" and is renowned for his flair with light, use of large-format polaroids, his 1920s style sepia-effect and his way of to artistically stripping his models of any excess and show them in their true, often melancholy form.

“You say goodbye, you smile, you are scared. I try to take all these masks away and little by little, subtract until you have something pure left. A kind of abandon, a kind of absence. It looks like an absence, but in fact when there is this emptiness I think the interior beauty comes out,” read his own words, launching the exhibit that featured nude portraits and provocative shots of models and celebrities like Rihanna and Milla Jovovich.

In a lot of ways, Paolo Roversi-Storie - was a final good bye and tribute to Sozzani, who worked closely with Roversi throughout her career.

“Roversi is represents dreams. He is romantic. His pictures seem like they are from the past but in reality can be something appropriate for today’s contemporary society,” Sozzani said in the documentary “Franca: Chaos and Creation," which was directed by her son Francesco Carrozzini. During the event, Sozzani’s friends and colleagues roamed the lavish, brocade-covered Prince Apartments of Milan’s Palazzo Reale in awe and silent acknowledgement that many of the photos were part of Sozzani’s own identity as a professional.

“Her magazine is her self portrait and from every photographer she takes what she needs to construct this portrait,” said Roversi in the same film.

Vogue Italia editor-in-chief Emanuele Farneti underscored how Roversi's career has contributed to the history of fashion as we know it. “He is an irreplaceable part of Vogue Italia’s identity. And the images in Fashion & Politics bear witness - never more current than today - to Vogue Italia’s contribution to international debate on issues of enormous political and social relevance”.

  

 



Sofia Celeste
FAIRPLAY Editor-in-Chief

When she is not hunting down the latest in tech and fashion, Sofia Celeste is scouting artisan talent for her online magazine bacoluxury.com. Born in the US and raised on the Pacific Island of Guam, she went on to write for Dow Jones Newswires and the Wall Street Journal. Her work is now regularly published in top fashion publications NOWFASHION and WWD.

MILAN, ITALY - Anyone familiar with the late Franca Sozzani’s career, knows full well that Vogue Italia used photography and visual art as a powerful tool to respond to the most controversial global scandals, catastrophes and social issues of our time.

It is no surprise that in her absence, Vogue Italia is powering on with the Photo Vogue Festival, the first international festival of fashion photography linked to a magazine, which unfolded to Milan from November 16 to 19.

Two main events kicked off the event: the industrial space BASE Milano was dedicated to the Fashion & Politics in Vogue Italia exhibit which highlighted the magazine's most impacting stories on issues such as environmental disaster, violence, diversity and the obsession with cosmetic surgery. The showcase underscored Emanuele Farneti’s commitment as editor, to continue that mission, as demonstrated through recent covers and its latest issue, for example, which was dedicated to the over-60s demographic. Images by Steven Meisel, David Lachapelle, Bruce Weber, Tim Walker, Peter Lindbergh, Miles Alridge, Mert & Marcus, Ethan James Green and Ellen Von Unwert evoked re ection on how fashion photography can often diminish taboos and combat racism.

The other main event, and perhaps the most emotional, was the exhibit at Palazzo Reale, which was dedicated to photographer Paolo Roversi’s 50-year career.

Roversi is often referred to as the “the maestro of fashion photography" and is renowned for his flair with light, use of large-format polaroids, his 1920s style sepia-effect and his way of to artistically stripping his models of any excess and show them in their true, often melancholy form.

“You say goodbye, you smile, you are scared. I try to take all these masks away and little by little, subtract until you have something pure left. A kind of abandon, a kind of absence. It looks like an absence, but in fact when there is this emptiness I think the interior beauty comes out,” read his own words, launching the exhibit that featured nude portraits and provocative shots of models and celebrities like Rihanna and Milla Jovovich.

In a lot of ways, Paolo Roversi-Storie - was a final good bye and tribute to Sozzani, who worked closely with Roversi throughout her career.

“Roversi is represents dreams. He is romantic. His pictures seem like they are from the past but in reality can be something appropriate for today’s contemporary society,” Sozzani said in the documentary “Franca: Chaos and Creation," which was directed by her son Francesco Carrozzini. During the event, Sozzani’s friends and colleagues roamed the lavish, brocade-covered Prince Apartments of Milan’s Palazzo Reale in awe and silent acknowledgement that many of the photos were part of Sozzani’s own identity as a professional.

“Her magazine is her self portrait and from every photographer she takes what she needs to construct this portrait,” said Roversi in the same film.

Vogue Italia editor-in-chief Emanuele Farneti underscored how Roversi's career has contributed to the history of fashion as we know it. “He is an irreplaceable part of Vogue Italia’s identity. And the images in Fashion & Politics bear witness - never more current than today - to Vogue Italia’s contribution to international debate on issues of enormous political and social relevance”.

  

 



Sofia Celeste
FAIRPLAY Editor-in-Chief

When she is not hunting down the latest in tech and fashion, Sofia Celeste is scouting artisan talent for her online magazine bacoluxury.com. Born in the US and raised on the Pacific Island of Guam, she went on to write for Dow Jones Newswires and the Wall Street Journal. Her work is now regularly published in top fashion publications NOWFASHION and WWD.