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Aladdin's Cave, A Tribute to Knitwear's History

By Sofia Celeste 28 June 2018

FLORENCE, ITALY - Pitti Immagine Filati’s 83rd edition is celebrating Italy’s history of knitwear through “Aladdin’s Cave," a treasure trove of fashions that derive their soul from Italian yarns. The showcase has been curated by Sonia Veroni, a fabrics expert and founder of Modateca Deanna, a vast archive of textiles from her family's company, Bologna-based Miss Deanna. Now owned by Giorgio Armani, Miss Deanna is a long-established knitwear firm that has worked with the world’s leading designers since the 1970s. The special exhibit, that highlights the most innovative and technologically advanced yarns in the nation's history, will be on display at the Fortezza Da Basso, until June 29.

Why Aladdin’s Cave?

We called it Aladdin’s Cave because when you work with knitwear starting from a yarn, it’s the most creative part. It’s always a creative process that starts from a soul. Knitwear designers feel that soul in a visceral way. It’s a very expressive way to describe our work.

What other collections did you work with?

Modateca Deanna is an archive that was born from the work from Miss Deanna, a knitwear factory that has collaborated for over 50 years with the best fashion companies all over the world. French, English, Americans - the most forward experimental designers in knitwear have worked on different levels with the company that was started by my parents.

Today, how has Miss Deanna and the archive evolved?

The company is now owned by Giorgio Armani and today, it only produces knitwear for Giorgio Armani. The archive is now a collector of other collections produced by other knitwear factories and other designers that were not necessarily working with us. It’s now an extraordinary collection of ideas and research and knowledge of everything that is being made in Italy.

How has knitwear evolved in Italy over the past five decades?

Knitwear is linked to technology and all of the development regarding the world of knitwear and machines and computers have helped knitwear to develop in a certain way. I think that knitwear is always about creativity. It’s about how you use and experiment with yarns, but
also what happens after you buy the yarn. It is also about tradition. Knitwear will always look back into what was done in the past - whilstapplying new innovation.

How do you see the future of knitwear evolving?

It's all about how sustainable can you be and how you can be creative but be aware of what is going on in the world. Marina Spadafora, for example, is one of the first mentors of sustainability movement and she is the ambassador of everything that is sustainable in Italy, before it became a trend. The collection at Pitti is a retrospective, which is still innovative. They were so experimental at that time. It was interesting to hear the comments from spectators who visited us today at the fair… people thought the fashions on display were new and made with new innovation. People were shocked to find some were from 1982. It all looks very in season.

Why did your family’s company boom in the 1960s and 1970s?

When my family started Miss Deanna, it was because of their passion that my mother felt related to knitwear and she was in love with yarns. Her creativity was endless because through yarn people have the power to create their own fabric. That was really the beginning of the times. What happened in the late 60s and 70s was that all the designers around the world, especially the ones in Paris became fascinated by knitwear and they all wanted to experiment with knitwear. A person like my mother could translate those creative ideas. My mother was lucky enough to work with many forward-thinking designers like Kenzo, who were young visionaries. He couldn’t find anyone in the world that would produce his collection because everyone thought his ideas were too complicated. She loved Kenzo. The first time she saw his sketches, she fell in love. She later worked with other big designers in Paris, like Yves Saint Laurent. The rest is history.

 



Sofia Celeste
FAIRPLAY Editor-in-Chief

When she is not hunting down the latest in tech and fashion, Sofia Celeste is scouting artisan talent for her online magazine bacoluxury.com. Born in the US and raised on the Pacific Island of Guam, she went on to write for Dow Jones Newswires and the Wall Street Journal. Her work is now regularly published in top fashion publications NOWFASHION and WWD.

 

 

FLORENCE, ITALY - Pitti Immagine Filati’s 83rd edition is celebrating Italy’s history of knitwear through “Aladdin’s Cave," a treasure trove of fashions that derive their soul from Italian yarns. The showcase has been curated by Sonia Veroni, a fabrics expert and founder of Modateca Deanna, a vast archive of textiles from her family's company, Bologna-based Miss Deanna. Now owned by Giorgio Armani, Miss Deanna is a long-established knitwear firm that has worked with the world’s leading designers since the 1970s. The special exhibit, that highlights the most innovative and technologically advanced yarns in the nation's history, will be on display at the Fortezza Da Basso, until June 29.

Why Aladdin’s Cave?

We called it Aladdin’s Cave because when you work with knitwear starting from a yarn, it’s the most creative part. It’s always a creative process that starts from a soul. Knitwear designers feel that soul in a visceral way. It’s a very expressive way to describe our work.

What other collections did you work with?

Modateca Deanna is an archive that was born from the work from Miss Deanna, a knitwear factory that has collaborated for over 50 years with the best fashion companies all over the world. French, English, Americans - the most forward experimental designers in knitwear have worked on different levels with the company that was started by my parents.

Today, how has Miss Deanna and the archive evolved?

The company is now owned by Giorgio Armani and today, it only produces knitwear for Giorgio Armani. The archive is now a collector of other collections produced by other knitwear factories and other designers that were not necessarily working with us. It’s now an extraordinary collection of ideas and research and knowledge of everything that is being made in Italy.

How has knitwear evolved in Italy over the past five decades?

Knitwear is linked to technology and all of the development regarding the world of knitwear and machines and computers have helped knitwear to develop in a certain way. I think that knitwear is always about creativity. It’s about how you use and experiment with yarns, but
also what happens after you buy the yarn. It is also about tradition. Knitwear will always look back into what was done in the past - whilstapplying new innovation.

How do you see the future of knitwear evolving?

It's all about how sustainable can you be and how you can be creative but be aware of what is going on in the world. Marina Spadafora, for example, is one of the first mentors of sustainability movement and she is the ambassador of everything that is sustainable in Italy, before it became a trend. The collection at Pitti is a retrospective, which is still innovative. They were so experimental at that time. It was interesting to hear the comments from spectators who visited us today at the fair… people thought the fashions on display were new and made with new innovation. People were shocked to find some were from 1982. It all looks very in season.

Why did your family’s company boom in the 1960s and 1970s?

When my family started Miss Deanna, it was because of their passion that my mother felt related to knitwear and she was in love with yarns. Her creativity was endless because through yarn people have the power to create their own fabric. That was really the beginning of the times. What happened in the late 60s and 70s was that all the designers around the world, especially the ones in Paris became fascinated by knitwear and they all wanted to experiment with knitwear. A person like my mother could translate those creative ideas. My mother was lucky enough to work with many forward-thinking designers like Kenzo, who were young visionaries. He couldn’t find anyone in the world that would produce his collection because everyone thought his ideas were too complicated. She loved Kenzo. The first time she saw his sketches, she fell in love. She later worked with other big designers in Paris, like Yves Saint Laurent. The rest is history.

 



Sofia Celeste
FAIRPLAY Editor-in-Chief

When she is not hunting down the latest in tech and fashion, Sofia Celeste is scouting artisan talent for her online magazine bacoluxury.com. Born in the US and raised on the Pacific Island of Guam, she went on to write for Dow Jones Newswires and the Wall Street Journal. Her work is now regularly published in top fashion publications NOWFASHION and WWD.

 

 

 

Photo: MODATECA DEANNA

 

Photo: MODATECA DEANNA

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