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People, Fashion & Trends

Marni Founders' Second Act

By Sofia Celeste 19 October 2018

MILAN, ITALY - The Castiglioni family, whose matriarch is Consuelo, the founder of the Marni brand known for its abstract patterns and chunky accessories, is back in the game. This time it's Consuelo's daughter, Carolina, at the helm with her first collection, Plan C, which will be released twice a year, to include womens ready-to-wear, knitwear, and accessories. With the help of her family, which has had a presence in the Italian fashion business since it began fur company Ciwifurs in the early 1960s, Plan C is very much a family affair.

Fairplay chatted with the 37-year-old mother of two, in a meeting room in what used to be her great grandmother's apartment on one of Milan's most historic streets, Via Visconti di Modrone.

Surrounded by roomy skirts, structured jumpers, and striped blouses made of Japanese cotton and men's shirt fabric, her first collection debuted in Milan in September during Milan's RTW shows. Carolina tells us, Plan C, which received very positive reviews from the international press, very much represents her breezy, casual style.

Why PLAN C?

Many meanings really... So, of course, it's Carolina and also represents Castiglioni. It's also a play on words and represents the plan after A and B.

And I said we were speaking before that there's two collections but it encompasses garments for all seasons really... we're thinking about people who have been to different climates and travel a lot. So could you talk a little bit about the woman who wears Plan C.

It's women only; I think it is a creative person – a very individualistic person that likes to play with things, and if she likes one piece, she will keep it for many seasons and beyond.
I didn't want to follow the trends and follow what’s in now, but rather what I like so all the pieces I create are pieces I love and would buy... The hope is that these pieces transcend seasons and can be mixed with other items in a lady's closet. It's really personal that way.

On a personal level, what do you like about the collection as a consumer? If you had to take yourself away for a second and look at it, what's your favorite part about it?

You know what, I selected all the pieces with this in mind: would I buy this or not. So, I really like everything I had. The collection was not created thinking of commercial point of view, or yeah, too many things, just instinct, and very personal.

I read that you like to wear baggy clothes or clothes that are not fitted or too sexy.

Yes, Yes.

What are some details about the collection that really stand out?

There are adjustable waistbands, for example, and very long shirts that can double as a very feminine dress. It's all about sculpture because some of the fabrics are very thick.

So before you were in charge of special events at Marni – and we just loved Marni Flower Market, which you were responsible for. Your roles are changing, now, how do you feel about this? Did you do a lot of designing before?

No, no, I just designed the kids wear, so this was the first time. And the approach is the same...But of course, everything is new for me because I have never designed a collection.
So I did a lot of research because it's a Spring/Summer collection. I decided to select a lot of cotton – like crispy cotton or technical ones, for example, some of which I found through Japanese textile firms.

The Castiglioni family, and Marni, which was started by your mom, seems to share a common aesthetic. Is this true? How are you different from your mom?

Yes, yes, yes, yes. This aesthetic always dominated my home life and has always been powerful...it was my life. I couldn't think to do a collection in a different way. My mother's taste is also my taste. But at the same time, we are different in age, and we are just different people so this is my new aesthetic.
I'd say I am more structured than my mom. Although we often like the same things... like the time we bought my daughter the same exact outfit from the same Tokyo boutique.

Is it hard to work in a family business?

It can be, but we all stick to doing our own jobs in the workplace. That's the secret.
 

 

 

 

Sofia Celeste
FAIRPLAY Editor-in-Chief

When she is not hunting down the latest in tech and fashion, Sofia Celeste is scouting artisan talent for her online magazine bacoluxury.com. Born in the US and raised on the Pacific Island of Guam, she went on to write for Dow Jones Newswires and the Wall Street Journal. Her work is now regularly published in top fashion publications NOWFASHION and WWD.

MILAN, ITALY - The Castiglioni family, whose matriarch is Consuelo, the founder of the Marni brand known for its abstract patterns and chunky accessories, is back in the game. This time it's Consuelo's daughter, Carolina, at the helm with her first collection, Plan C, which will be released twice a year, to include womens ready-to-wear, knitwear, and accessories. With the help of her family, which has had a presence in the Italian fashion business since it began fur company Ciwifurs in the early 1960s, Plan C is very much a family affair.

Fairplay chatted with the 37-year-old mother of two, in a meeting room in what used to be her great grandmother's apartment on one of Milan's most historic streets, Via Visconti di Modrone.

Surrounded by roomy skirts, structured jumpers, and striped blouses made of Japanese cotton and men's shirt fabric, her first collection debuted in Milan in September during Milan's RTW shows. Carolina tells us, Plan C, which received very positive reviews from the international press, very much represents her breezy, casual style.

Why PLAN C?

Many meanings really... So, of course, it's Carolina and also represents Castiglioni. It's also a play on words and represents the plan after A and B.

And I said we were speaking before that there's two collections but it encompasses garments for all seasons really... we're thinking about people who have been to different climates and travel a lot. So could you talk a little bit about the woman who wears Plan C.

It's women only; I think it is a creative person – a very individualistic person that likes to play with things, and if she likes one piece, she will keep it for many seasons and beyond.
I didn't want to follow the trends and follow what’s in now, but rather what I like so all the pieces I create are pieces I love and would buy... The hope is that these pieces transcend seasons and can be mixed with other items in a lady's closet. It's really personal that way.

On a personal level, what do you like about the collection as a consumer? If you had to take yourself away for a second and look at it, what's your favorite part about it?

You know what, I selected all the pieces with this in mind: would I buy this or not. So, I really like everything I had. The collection was not created thinking of commercial point of view, or yeah, too many things, just instinct, and very personal.

I read that you like to wear baggy clothes or clothes that are not fitted or too sexy.

Yes, Yes.

What are some details about the collection that really stand out?

There are adjustable waistbands, for example, and very long shirts that can double as a very feminine dress. It's all about sculpture because some of the fabrics are very thick.

So before you were in charge of special events at Marni – and we just loved Marni Flower Market, which you were responsible for. Your roles are changing, now, how do you feel about this? Did you do a lot of designing before?

No, no, I just designed the kids wear, so this was the first time. And the approach is the same...But of course, everything is new for me because I have never designed a collection.
So I did a lot of research because it's a Spring/Summer collection. I decided to select a lot of cotton – like crispy cotton or technical ones, for example, some of which I found through Japanese textile firms.

The Castiglioni family, and Marni, which was started by your mom, seems to share a common aesthetic. Is this true? How are you different from your mom?

Yes, yes, yes, yes. This aesthetic always dominated my home life and has always been powerful...it was my life. I couldn't think to do a collection in a different way. My mother's taste is also my taste. But at the same time, we are different in age, and we are just different people so this is my new aesthetic.
I'd say I am more structured than my mom. Although we often like the same things... like the time we bought my daughter the same exact outfit from the same Tokyo boutique.

Is it hard to work in a family business?

It can be, but we all stick to doing our own jobs in the workplace. That's the secret.
 

 

 

 

Sofia Celeste
FAIRPLAY Editor-in-Chief

When she is not hunting down the latest in tech and fashion, Sofia Celeste is scouting artisan talent for her online magazine bacoluxury.com. Born in the US and raised on the Pacific Island of Guam, she went on to write for Dow Jones Newswires and the Wall Street Journal. Her work is now regularly published in top fashion publications NOWFASHION and WWD.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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