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Gucci Supported Diversity Film Debuts

By Sofia Celeste 15 novembre 2018

MILAN, ITALY - An unlikely patron of a film based on the reality of mental disability and social diversity, fashion mega house Gucci was the silent catalyst driving the movement behind the film Be Kind. The 84-minute documentary celebrates the beauty of being different and debuted at Milan's Anteo cinema this week, in a private viewing, before the city’s fashion and design elite.

The film is narrated by a charismatic 13 year old named Nino Monteleone, who despite his challenges with autism, possesses an incredible theatrical flair and talent for interviewing.

Nino embarks on a journey throughout Italy, with his mother, director, actress and producer Sabrina Paravicini. Their road trip begins in their Alpine hometown of Morbegno and reaches down to Rome and beyond where they meet Sofia, a swimmer with down syndrome and Roberto Saviano, an Italian journalist, writer and essayist who rose to fame with his book “Gomorrah,” an investigative report on the reality of the Naples Camorra mafia syndicate.

In his interview with Nino, Saviano, a mafia target, discusses his struggles with living under the protection of the Italian law enforcement authorities.

“Maybe I should be like you, Nino. Maybe I should describe diversity in pastel, rather than with a hammer,” Saviano confided.

As the film progresses, Nino digs deep into the reality of mental disability, in Italy, a country that benefits from a socialised yet underfunded medical system that is supported by doctors who are often well trained but underpaid.

Laura Boerci, an artist, educator and writer who sufferers from spinal muscular atrophy spoke about championing her disease, a neuromuscular disorder that attacks the muscles. After losing the use of her legs and arms, Boerci, who aspired to be a fashion designer, now exercises her creativity by painting, whilst holding a paintbrush between her lips. A local politician in a small town outside of Milan, Boerci said that fashion brands like Gucci should do more to include people with disabilities. “Fashion in the end makes people happy,” Boerci told Nino, noting one of her biggest achievements was producing a fashion show for people dealing with various handicaps.

Gucci president and chief executive officer Marco Bizzarri told WWD last year that inclusiveness is top on the brand’s agenda, in terms of style, customer reach and campaigns. “In the past two years, we have implemented a complete turnaround of our company, following our mantra of being the voice of self-expression. Attracting, retaining and promoting talent, while celebrating ethnic, age, sexual and gender diversity, sexual orientation and gender identity across the company, is our mission, which is completely consistent with the vision of our parent company, Kering," Bizzarri said.

In addition to Gucci as a main sponsor, fashion brand strategist Helen Nonini served as executive and strategy producer. Nonini who brought Gucci on board as main sponsor of the film, has counselled a number of top luxury brands. She was also interviewed by Nino. In the interview, she discussed her struggles with being bullied as a child, upon moving to Italy from the Middle East.

Other participants include composer and renowed cellist Piero Salvatori, who donated the entire soundtrack.

Nino's voyage ultimately brought to the fore the growing concern over his own condition.

The number of individuals on the autism spectrum has risen exponentially over the last decade. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health contributed to a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported earlier this year that autism in the United States rose 15% over the last two years.

The film, which has received national acclaim, will now travel to other major Italian cities like Torino, Rome, Bologna and Florence.

For more info, visit: lets-be-kind.com

 

 

 

Sofia Celeste
FAIRPLAY Editor-in-Chief

When she is not hunting down the latest in tech and fashion, Sofia Celeste is scouting artisan talent for her online magazine bacoluxury.com. Born in the US and raised on the Pacific Island of Guam, she went on to write for Dow Jones Newswires and the Wall Street Journal. Her work is now regularly published in top fashion publications NOWFASHION and WWD.

MILAN, ITALY - An unlikely patron of a film based on the reality of mental disability and social diversity, fashion mega house Gucci was the silent catalyst driving the movement behind the film Be Kind. The 84-minute documentary celebrates the beauty of being different and debuted at Milan's Anteo cinema this week, in a private viewing, before the city’s fashion and design elite.

The film is narrated by a charismatic 13 year old named Nino Monteleone, who despite his challenges with autism, possesses an incredible theatrical flair and talent for interviewing.

Nino embarks on a journey throughout Italy, with his mother, director, actress and producer Sabrina Paravicini. Their road trip begins in their Alpine hometown of Morbegno and reaches down to Rome and beyond where they meet Sofia, a swimmer with down syndrome and Roberto Saviano, an Italian journalist, writer and essayist who rose to fame with his book “Gomorrah,” an investigative report on the reality of the Naples Camorra mafia syndicate.

In his interview with Nino, Saviano, a mafia target, discusses his struggles with living under the protection of the Italian law enforcement authorities.

“Maybe I should be like you, Nino. Maybe I should describe diversity in pastel, rather than with a hammer,” Saviano confided.

As the film progresses, Nino digs deep into the reality of mental disability, in Italy, a country that benefits from a socialised yet underfunded medical system that is supported by doctors who are often well trained but underpaid.

Laura Boerci, an artist, educator and writer who sufferers from spinal muscular atrophy spoke about championing her disease, a neuromuscular disorder that attacks the muscles. After losing the use of her legs and arms, Boerci, who aspired to be a fashion designer, now exercises her creativity by painting, whilst holding a paintbrush between her lips. A local politician in a small town outside of Milan, Boerci said that fashion brands like Gucci should do more to include people with disabilities. “Fashion in the end makes people happy,” Boerci told Nino, noting one of her biggest achievements was producing a fashion show for people dealing with various handicaps.

Gucci president and chief executive officer Marco Bizzarri told WWD last year that inclusiveness is top on the brand’s agenda, in terms of style, customer reach and campaigns. “In the past two years, we have implemented a complete turnaround of our company, following our mantra of being the voice of self-expression. Attracting, retaining and promoting talent, while celebrating ethnic, age, sexual and gender diversity, sexual orientation and gender identity across the company, is our mission, which is completely consistent with the vision of our parent company, Kering," Bizzarri said.

In addition to Gucci as a main sponsor, fashion brand strategist Helen Nonini served as executive and strategy producer. Nonini who brought Gucci on board as main sponsor of the film, has counselled a number of top luxury brands. She was also interviewed by Nino. In the interview, she discussed her struggles with being bullied as a child, upon moving to Italy from the Middle East.

Other participants include composer and renowed cellist Piero Salvatori, who donated the entire soundtrack.

Nino's voyage ultimately brought to the fore the growing concern over his own condition.

The number of individuals on the autism spectrum has risen exponentially over the last decade. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health contributed to a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported earlier this year that autism in the United States rose 15% over the last two years.

The film, which has received national acclaim, will now travel to other major Italian cities like Torino, Rome, Bologna and Florence.

For more info, visit: lets-be-kind.com

 

 

 

Sofia Celeste
FAIRPLAY Editor-in-Chief

When she is not hunting down the latest in tech and fashion, Sofia Celeste is scouting artisan talent for her online magazine bacoluxury.com. Born in the US and raised on the Pacific Island of Guam, she went on to write for Dow Jones Newswires and the Wall Street Journal. Her work is now regularly published in top fashion publications NOWFASHION and WWD.

 

Photo: Be Kind

 

 

Photo: Be Kind

 

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